“Planetary Gentrification” authors-meet-Critics session at RGS-IBG annual conference 2016

PlanetaryGentrification-CoverVisualI am very much looking forward to this ‘authors-meet-critics’ session at this year’s RGS-IBG annual conference, featuring my co-authored book Planetary Gentrification.

The session is to be convened and chaired by Professor Ronan Paddision (University of Glasglow), and sees the contributions from three critics, Professor David Ley (The University of British Columbia), Dr Andy Merrifield and Dr Kate Maclean (Birkbeck, University of London). All three authors are also going to be present (Ernesto via Skype connection).

The session is sponsored by the journal Urban Studies, and is followed by a drink reception in the Drayson Room from 18.45.

 

235 Authors meet critics: Planetary gentrification
Convenor(s) Ronan Paddison (University of Glasgow, UK)
Chair(s) Ronan Paddison (University of Glasgow, UK)
Timetable Thursday 01 September 2016, Session 4 (16:50 – 18:30)
Room RGS-IBG Ondaatje Theatre
Session abstract At the beginning of the C21st proclamations rang out that gentrification had gone global, this book critically evaluates that assumption. Drawing on the ‘new’ comparative urbanism and writings on planetary urbanization the book argues that gentrification is one of the most significant and socially unjust processes affecting cities world-wide today. Looking beyond the usual gentrification suspects in Euro-America, towards ‘non-Western cities’ in the Global South and East, the authors undertake a much needed transurban learning underpinned by a critical political economy approach. The book shows that gentrification has unfolded at a planetary scale, but it has not assumed a North to South or West to East trajectory, it is much more complex than that. Rich with empirical detail, yet wide-ranging, Planetary Gentrification unhinges, unsettles, and provincializes Western notions of urban development. The book is invaluable to urban scholars interested in the Future of Cities and the production of a truly global urban studies, and to all those committed to social justice in cities. Sponsored by Urban Studies

 

EARCAG Conference Session, Dec 2016: Speculative Urbanisation and Resistant Politics in East Asia

Session Organiser:

  • Laam Hae (York University, Canada)
  • Hyun Bang Shin (London School of Economics and Political Science, UK)

Please reach the organiser at lhae@yorku.ca or h.b.shin@lse.ac.uk if you are interested to present in this session.


In the Western literature, post-industrialisation and global financialisation are identified as a main driver of the rise of property-based urban accumulation, resulting in speculation in the real estate sector. However, in East Asia, land and housing have been subject to rampant speculation during the last three decades of urbanisation and city-making, and not necessarily a result of post-industrialisation, although the region’s declining profitability of manufacturing industries would have contributed to the further rise of real estate speculation that guaranteed high returns on ‘investment’ (Haila, 1999, 2000; Shin; 2016; Shin and Kim, 2016). While East Asian real estate speculation can be understood broadly as social, economic and spatial manifestation of developmental urbanisation, it is also important to acknowledge unevenness in the ways in which such speculation has taken place among different countries in the region. That is, speculation over the urban built environment has been an embedded process in each country, moored in contexts and histories of local politics, economies and societies and expressed in locally specific ways.

In this regard, this session aims to bring together papers that can engage with the following (and other related) questions.

  • How has speculative urbanisation been unfolding in East Asian cities in locally specific ways?
  • What does speculative urbanisation signify in the changing political economy and emerging (re)formations of social structure including class, gender/race relations in each country?
  • How is the process of real estate speculation fraught with dispossession of people’s rights and displacement of the un/propertied?
  • In what ways have various mechanisms of social reproduction been shaped by the unfolding speculation?

We particularly welcome papers that discuss the transformative potential of various resistant politics that have emerged against speculative urbanisation in East Asia.

CFP: 2nd International Conference on Cultural Political Economy, 25-26 August 2016

Forwarding an announcement from Dr Ngai-Ling Sum at Lancaster University. The Cultural Political Economy Research Centre in Lancaster University is organising its second international conference on cultural political economy, this time in partnership with the Graduate School of Education in Bristol University. Below is the CFP for the event. Abstract submission deadline is 29 April 2016.


The Cultural Political Economy Research Centre in Lancaster University, in partnership with the Graduate School of Education in Bristol University will be hosting the second international conference between 25-26 August 2016. We are sending out this call for papers and look forward to hearing from you.

Conference Theme: Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

Hosted by the Centre for Globalization, Education and Social Futures

Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol

The second international conference on Cultural Political Economy will be hosted by the Centre for Globalization, Education and Social Futures at Bristol University build on the highly successful event held at the University of Lancaster in 2015 hosted by Bob Jessop and Ngai-Ling Sum in partnership with Lancaster’s Cultural Political Economy Research Centre (CPERC). The conference is an important part of the ongoing development of a theoretical and empirical engagement with Cultural Political Economy.

Call for Papers

The organizers welcome proposals for papers and panels on the following, illustrative topics: other themes are also welcome:

  • What does it mean to be critical?
  • Cultural turns in different fields of inquiry
  • Critical Discourse Analysis and Political Economy
  • Critical cultural political economy
  • Marx, Gramsci and Foucault
  • Intersectionalism and Political Economy
  • Social Relations, Everyday Life and Subjectivities
  • State, Governance and Governmentality
  • Reimagining civil society
  • Rethinking civilizational paradigms
  • Aesthetics and performance of political economy
  • Spatial imaginaries, geoeconomics and geopolitics
  • Spatialities and temporalities of borders and migration
  • Neoliberalism and crisis dynamics
  • Global capitalism, crises and imagined recoveries
  • Globalization of production, commerce and finance
  • Finance, austerity and debt
  • Work, employment, body and embodiment
  • Competition, competitiveness and resilience
  • Globalization, education and societies
  • Sustainability and green capitalism
  • Inequalities of wealth and income
  • Subalternity, social movements and resistance

For further information, please go to http://cpe2016.com/ and send your proposal to cpe-2016@bristol.ac.uk

 

AAG annual meeting in San Francisco, 2016

Back in the US, this time to take part in this year’s annual meeing of the American Association of Geographers in San Francisco, a city that I am visiting for the first time, so quite excited about the prospect of meeting new colleagues, exchanging thoughts and catching up with old friends. My sessions are as follows:

2nd Call for Papers for EARCAG in December 2016

Please see the message below from EARCAG conference secretariat. EARCAG stands for the East Asian Regional Conference in Alternative Geography, which brings together critical geographers around the world who work on the East Asian region. This time, the conference is to be held in Hong Kong in December 2016. I’m also planning to attend this, and it will be good to see more of my colleagues coming to Hong Kong.

===== forwarded message begins =====

-please circulate to those who may be interested, thank you; sorry for cross-posting-

The Department of Geography at Hong Kong Baptist University will organise the 8th meeting of the East Asian Regional Conference in Alternative Geography (EARCAG) on 6th-8th December 2016. EARCAG aims to establish an international network among alternative geographers in East Asia and to explore further perspectives to investigate local geographical issues in East Asia.

The main theme of this meeting is Radicalism in Theory and Practice. Attached please find the second call for papers. Please note that the deadline for abstract submissions is scheduled on 10th March 2016. Besides the themes of this conference, we welcome all sorts of relevant topics and area focuses.

To know more, please visit our homepage: http://geog.hkbu.edu.hk/earcag

Should you have any enquiries, please email us at earcag@hkbu.edu.hk

Best regards,
Conference Secretariat for
The 8th Meeting of East Asian Regional Conference in Alternative Geography

earcag@hkbu.edu.hk
http://geog.hkbu.edu.hk/earcag

P1220388-001

Hong Kong Island (Photographed by Hyun Bang Shin, 2010)