AAG annual meeting in San Francisco, 2016

Back in the US, this time to take part in this year’s annual meeing of the American Association of Geographers in San Francisco, a city that I am visiting for the first time, so quite excited about the prospect of meeting new colleagues, exchanging thoughts and catching up with old friends. My sessions are as follows:

Republication of my Urban Spectacles paper in Alternative Sud

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arton4063I am pleased to see the printed version of a new special issue from Alternative Sud, a quarterly publication by CETRI based in Belgium. The special issue on Sport and Globalisation includes a reprinted paper of mine, “Spectacles urbains, méga-événements sportifs et inégalités en Chine”. This was originally published in the journal City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action (to view the original paper, please go to the journal web site or click here). Many thanks to the editorial team at Alternative Sud for bringing the papers together and thinking of me for inclusion in the special issue. Also thanks a lot to the management team at Routledge for kindly supporting the reprinting.

Abstract in French: En Chine, la promotion de grands spectacles urbains et de méga-événements sportifs repose sur un discours de « société harmonieuse ». La propagande nationaliste qui les accompagne vise à créer un sentiment d’unité et à apaiser le mécontentement sociopolitique provoqué par les inégalités, les tensions ethniques et la fracture entre les mondes urbain et rural. Une stratégie de déplacement des problèmes plutôt que de résolution de ceux-ci.

More details about the CETRI is as follows:

The Tricontinental Centre (CETRI), is a Non-Governmental Organisation founded in 1976 and based in Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). CETRI is committed to study, publications and training in issues of development and North-South relations. Its main aim is to provide a transmission channel for the voices of the South and contribute to a critical examination of the dominant conceptions and practices of development in the era of neo-liberal globalisation. Emphasis is on understanding and discussing the role of social and political actors in the South in their struggle for social, political, cultural and ecological rights.

Book Launch | Planetary Gentrification, 16 March 2016, LSE

Very much looking forward to the launch of my latest book Planetary Gentrification (2016, Polity Press) with Loretta Lees and Ernesto López-Morales. Reblogged from http://www.theurbansalon.org/index.php?page=3.1.0


 

16 March 2016 // Next Urban Salon seminar

Book Launch: Planetary Gentrification (2016, Polity Press)

To celebrate the launch of a new book Planetary Gentrification by Loretta Lees, Hyun Bang Shin and Ernesto Lopez-Morales, join us on the evening of Wednesday 16 March for a special launch event at LSE.

Please register on Eventbrite before 29th February (or until places are filled).

Date and Time: 16 March 2016, 17.30 – 20.00
Venue: Room PAR.LG.03, Parish Building (via North Entrance), LSE (see LSE Maps)

Authors: Loretta Lees (University of Leicester), Hyun Bang Shin (LSE) and Ernesto Lopez-Morales (University of Chile, Santiago)

Discussants: Fulong Wu (UCL), Andrew Harris (UCL) and Alex Loftus (KCL)

Supported by:
Department of Geography and Environment, LSE;
Department of Geography, University of Leicester;
CITY: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action

PlanetaryGentrification-CoverVisualBook description

This is the first book in Polity’s new ‘Urban Futures’ series.

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, proclamations rang out that gentrification had gone global. But what do we mean by ‘gentrification’ today? How can we compare ‘gentrification’ in New York and London with that in Shanghai, Johannesburg, Mumbai and Rio de Janeiro? This book argues that gentrification is one of the most significant and socially unjust processes affecting cities worldwide today, and one that demands renewed critical assessment.

Drawing on the ‘new’ comparative urbanism and writings on planetary urbanization, the authors undertake a much-needed transurban analysis underpinned by a critical political economy approach. Looking beyond the usual gentrification suspects in Europe and North America to non-Western cases, from slum gentrification to mega-displacement, they show that gentrification has unfolded at a planetary scale, but it has not assumed a North to South or West to East trajectory the story is much more complex than that.

Rich with empirical detail, yet wide-ranging, Planetary Gentrification unhinges, unsettles and provincializes Western notions of urban development. It will be invaluable to students and scholars interested in the future of cities and the production of a truly global urban studies, and equally importantly to all those committed to social justice in cities.