CFP: 2nd International Conference on Cultural Political Economy, 25-26 August 2016

Forwarding an announcement from Dr Ngai-Ling Sum at Lancaster University. The Cultural Political Economy Research Centre in Lancaster University is organising its second international conference on cultural political economy, this time in partnership with the Graduate School of Education in Bristol University. Below is the CFP for the event. Abstract submission deadline is 29 April 2016.


The Cultural Political Economy Research Centre in Lancaster University, in partnership with the Graduate School of Education in Bristol University will be hosting the second international conference between 25-26 August 2016. We are sending out this call for papers and look forward to hearing from you.

Conference Theme: Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

Hosted by the Centre for Globalization, Education and Social Futures

Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol

The second international conference on Cultural Political Economy will be hosted by the Centre for Globalization, Education and Social Futures at Bristol University build on the highly successful event held at the University of Lancaster in 2015 hosted by Bob Jessop and Ngai-Ling Sum in partnership with Lancaster’s Cultural Political Economy Research Centre (CPERC). The conference is an important part of the ongoing development of a theoretical and empirical engagement with Cultural Political Economy.

Call for Papers

The organizers welcome proposals for papers and panels on the following, illustrative topics: other themes are also welcome:

  • What does it mean to be critical?
  • Cultural turns in different fields of inquiry
  • Critical Discourse Analysis and Political Economy
  • Critical cultural political economy
  • Marx, Gramsci and Foucault
  • Intersectionalism and Political Economy
  • Social Relations, Everyday Life and Subjectivities
  • State, Governance and Governmentality
  • Reimagining civil society
  • Rethinking civilizational paradigms
  • Aesthetics and performance of political economy
  • Spatial imaginaries, geoeconomics and geopolitics
  • Spatialities and temporalities of borders and migration
  • Neoliberalism and crisis dynamics
  • Global capitalism, crises and imagined recoveries
  • Globalization of production, commerce and finance
  • Finance, austerity and debt
  • Work, employment, body and embodiment
  • Competition, competitiveness and resilience
  • Globalization, education and societies
  • Sustainability and green capitalism
  • Inequalities of wealth and income
  • Subalternity, social movements and resistance

For further information, please go to http://cpe2016.com/ and send your proposal to cpe-2016@bristol.ac.uk

 

CFP RC21 2015: (Re-)making Cities: the politics of scale in mega-projects in Asia and beyond

With apologies for any cross-posting,

Call for Abstracts

RC21 International Conference on The Ideal City: Between Myth and Reality

27-29 August 2015  |  Urbino, Italy

 

(Re-)making Cities: the politics of scale in mega-projects in Asia and beyond

STREAM F – Urban renewal

The globalisation of Asian economies has accompanied the emergence of urban real estate development, a key characteristic of late capitalism, as one of the main pillars of their economic expansion. The result has been speculative urbanisation, driven by desires of individual and/or corporate investors, central and/or local state elites, and domestic and/or transnational businesses. Their collective interests are reflected in the proliferation of state-led mega-projects to install iconic landmark buildings, new towns, and new CBDs in and outside existing urban centres, the experiences of which have been also increasingly inter-referenced within Asia.

In order to understand the above-mentioned processes of city (re-)making, it is important to overcome state-centric perspectives and adopt a relational approach that pays attention to inter-scalar dynamics and the politics of scale. For instance, the domination of Asian developmental states does not necessarily mean that the developmental ethos and visions, held in a particular period and space, had been uniform across factions in the state and capital. Such ethos and visions that led to the production of new towns and special zones of development would have been subject to geopolitical as well as domestic struggles.

This stream aims to scrutinise how the aspirations of Asian developmental states have been reflected in the course of (re-)making cities, and, at the same time, contested by non-state actors, civic organisations and local resents at various geographical scales. It invites contributions that critically examine why and how particular interests were represented, how they mobilised mega-projects and shaped cities ultimately in their own imagination, what roles local communities, nascent advocacy groups or popular struggles played in contesting the state-led mega-projects. Papers that attempt to compare the Asian experiences with those elsewhere are also welcomed.

Organizers: Hyun Bang Shin (London School of Economics and Political Science, UK); Bae-Gyoon Park (Seoul National University, KR); Dong-Wan Gimm (Seoul National University, KR).

Contacts: h.b.shin@lse.ac.ukgeopbg@snu.ac.krdw.gimm@gmail.com

Deadline January 31 2015

Abstracts should be sent by e-mail to abstracts@rc21.org and to the session organizers. Please consult the conference web site for more details.