Arriving soon: Neoliberal Urbanism, Contested Cities and Housing in Asia

I have posted earlier (see here) about a new forthcoming book from @Palgrave_, Neoliberal Urbanism, Contested Cities and Housing in Asia, and it is my pleasure to confirm that the book proof has been finalised and it’s ready for the final production. The book’s cover image is also finalised and is attached here as follows. The image shows an aerial view of Taipei City – the selection of Taipei City was a conscious decision, as the image depicts a mix of diverse urban forms as well as the juxtaposition of both nature and the second nature (the built environment) in an urban space that presents a palimpsest of layers of social relations and histories of contestations. All these speak to the main themes of the book.

https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137517500

What is the book about?

Considering Asian cities ranging from Taipei, Hong Kong and Bangkok to Hanoi, Nanjing and Seoul, this collection discusses the socio-political processes of how neoliberalization entwines with local political economies and legacies of ‘developmental’ or ‘socialist’ statism to produce urban contestations centered on housing. The book takes housing as a key entry point, given its prime position in the making of social and economic policies as well as the political legitimacy of Asian states. It examines urban policies related to housing in Asian economies in order to explore their continuing alterations and mutations, as they come into conflict and coalesce with neoliberal policies. In discussing the experience of each city, it takes into consideration the variegated relations between the state, the market and the society, and explores how the global pressure of neoliberalization has manifested in each country and has influenced the shaping of national housing questions.

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1. Centering Housing Questions in Asian Cities (Yi-Ling Chen and Hyun Bang Shin)
  • Chapter 2. ‘Re-occupying the State’: Social Housing Movement and the Transformation of Housing Policies in Taiwan (Yi-Ling Chen)
  • Chapter 3. Displacement by Neoliberalism: Addressing the Housing Crisis of Hong Kong in the Restructuring of Pearl River Delta Region (Shu-Mei Huang)
  • Chapter 4. When Neoliberalization Meets Clientelism: Housing Policies for Low- and Middle-Income Housing in Bangkok (Thammarat Marohabutr)
  • Chapter 5. Neoliberal Urbanism Meets Socialist Modernism: Vietnam’s Post-Reform Housing Policies and the New Urban Zones of Hanoi (Hoai Anh Tran and Ngai-Ming Yip)
  • Chapter 6. Beyond Property Rights and Displacement: China’s Neoliberal Transformation and Housing Inequalities (Zhao Zhang)
  • Chapter 7. Development and Inequality in Urban China: The Privatization of Homeownership and the Transformation of Everyday Practice (Sarah Tynen)
  • Chapter 8. Weaving the Common in the Financialized City: A Case of Urban Cohousing Experience in South Korea (Didi K. Han)
  • Chapter 9. Contesting Property Hegemony in Asian Cities (Hyun Bang Shin)

Forthcoming book, Neoliberal Urbanism, Contested Cities and Housing in Asia (Palgrave Macmillan)

Chen, Y.-L. and Shin, H.B. (eds.) (in press) Neoliberal Urbanism, Contested Cities and Housing in Asia. Palgrave Macmillan

Above is an edited volume that I have been working on as co-editor is now at the production stage, scheduled to appear in July 2019. The other co-editor is Dr Yi-Ling Chen at the University of Wyoming. Below is a summary outline of the book as displayed on the publisher’s web site:

Considering Asian cities ranging from Taipei, Hong Kong and Bangkok to Hanoi, Nanjing and Seoul, this collection discusses the socio-political processes of how neoliberalization entwines with local political economies and legacies of ‘developmental’ or ‘socialist’ statism to produce urban contestations centered on housing. The book takes housing as a key entry point, given its prime position in the making of social and economic policies as well as the political legitimacy of Asian states. It examines urban policies related to housing in Asian economies in order to explore their continuing alterations and mutations, as they come into conflict and coalesce with neoliberal policies. In discussing the experience of each city, it takes into consideration the variegated relations between the state, the market and the society, and explores how the global pressure of neoliberalization has manifested in each country and has influenced the shaping of national housing questions.

The book includes nine chapters in total, covering Taipei, Ho Chi Minh City, Nanjing, Bangkok, Seoul and Hong Kong. The table of contents is as follows:


Chapter 1. Centering Housing Questions in Asian Cities (Yi-Ling Chen, The University of Wyoming; Hyun Bang Shin, London School of Economics and Political Science)

Chapter 2. ‘Re-occupying the State’: Social Housing Movement and the Transformation of Housing Policies in Taiwan (Yi-Ling Chen, The University of Wyoming)

Chapter 3. Displacement by Neoliberalism: Addressing the Housing Crisis of Hong Kong in the Restructuring Pearl River Delta Region (Shu-Mei Huang, National Taiwan University)

Chapter 4. When Neoliberalization meets Clientelism: Housing Policies for Low- and Middle-Income Housing in Bangkok (Thammarat Marohabutr, Mahidol University)

Chapter 5. Neoliberal Urbanism Meets Socialist Modernism: Vietnam’s Post Reform Housing Policies and the New Urban Zones of Hanoi (Hoai Anh Tran, Malmö University; Ngai-Ming Yip, City University of Hong Kong)

Chapter 6. Beyond Property Rights and Displacement: China’s Neoliberal Transformation and Housing Inequalities (Zhao Zhang, Zhejiang University of Technology)

Chapter 7. Development and Inequality in Urban China: The Privatization of Homeownership and the Transformation of Everyday Practice (Sarah Tynen, University of Colorado Boulder)

Chapter 8. Weaving the Common in the Financialized City: A Case of Urban Cohousing Experience in South Korea (Didi K. Han, London School of Economics and Political Science)

Chapter 9. Contesting Property Hegemony in Asian Cities (Hyun Bang Shin, London School of Economics and Political Science)


As is expressed in the book’s collective acknowledgments, the book has become “a product of an enduring process, involving negotiations with academic and family responsibilities that have spanned across three continents.” I am glad to see it coming to its material presence. Many thanks are owed to all the chapter contributors and other colleagues who provided insights and inspirations.

Forthcoming paper, #Asian #urbanism, from the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Urban and Regional Studies

A paper of mine on Asian Urbanism is going to appear in the forthcoming Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Urban and Regional Studies, scheduled to be published in April 2019. Its author copy in PDF is downloadable from the LSE Research Online page found on this link: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/91490/

Abstract:

This chapter on Asian urbanism begins by examining how Asian urbanism can be seen as both actually existing and imagined, taking into consideration the ways in which Asian urbanism has entailed the use of successful Asian cities as reference points for other cities in the Global South on the one hand, and how such referencing practices often entail the rendering of Asian urbanism as imagined models and ideologies that are detached from the realities of the receiving end of the model transfer on the other. The ensuing section examines how Asian urbanism can be situated in the context of state-society relations, with a particular emphasis on the role of the Asian states that exhibited developmental and/or authoritarian orientations in the late twentieth century. The penultimate section explores the socio-spatiality of Asian urbanism, summarising some salient characteristics of Asian urbanism. The final section concludes with an emphasis on the need of avoiding Asian exceptionalism, and also of having a pluralistic perspective on Asian urbanism.

LSE-Southeast Asia Early Career Researchers Network Symposium

Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre is organising its first ever #ECR networking event to take place on 13th February at LSE. Please see the event description in the image below. This is an exciting opportunity to meet ECRs working on Southeast Asia. If you cannot attend but want to be added to the networ list, please send your message to seac.admin@lse.ac.uk, introducing who you are and what you currently do.

[New book] Developmentalist Cities? Interrogating Urban Developmentalism in East Asia, edited by Jamie Doucette and Bae-Gyoon Park

Colleagues and students interested in understanding the ‘developmentalist’ interpretation of urbanisation in East Asia would be delighted to see the this new volume, Developmentalist Cities? Interrogating Urban Developmentalism in East Asia, edited by Jamie Doucette (University of Manchester) and Bae-Gyoon Park (Seoul National University), published by Brill in November 2018.

I am pleased to receive an author copy of this new book just now, and look forward to browsing many interesting chapters in the volume. Many thanks to Jamie and Bae-Gyoon for kindly republishing my Urban Studies paper (co-authored with Soo-hyun Kim, now in the President’s Office in South Korea) in their volume, which in this volume is titled “The Developmental State, Speculative Urbanization and the Politics of Displacement in Gentrifying Seoul” (pp. 245-270). The original Urban Studies paper version can be found here.

Below is the brief description of the book as explained on the publisher’s web site for your information:

Developmentalist Cities addresses the missing urbanstory in research on East Asian developmentalism and the missing developmentalist story in studies of East Asian urbanization. It does so by promoting inter-disciplinary research into the subject of urban developmentalism: a term that editors Jamie Doucette and Bae-Gyoon Park use to highlight the particular nature of the urban as a site of and for developmentalist intervention. The contributors to this volume deepen this concept by examining the legacy of how Cold War and post-Cold War geopolitical economy, spaces of exception (from special zones to industrial districts), and diverse forms of expertise have helped produce urban space in East Asia. 

https://brill.com/view/title/34395

Urban Salon seminar: Why Detroit Matters at LSE, 9-Jan-2019

The first #UrbanSalon (http://theurbansalon.com) event in 2019 is to take place on 09 January 2019, Wed 4pm, featuring Loretta Lees (University of Leicester), Phil Hubbard (King’s College London) and Brian Doucet (University of Waterloo) to discuss Why #Detroit Matters.

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/why-detroit-matters-decline-renewal-and-hope-in-a-divided-city-tickets-53947445261

Why Detroit Matters: Decline, Renewal and Hope in a Divided City

Hosted by the Urban Salon with the Department of Geography and Environment, LSE

Description

Detroit has come to symbolise deindustrialization and the challenges, and opportunities, it presents. As many cities struggle with urban decline, racial and ethnic tensions and the consequences of neoliberal governance and political fragmentation, Detroit’s relevance grows stronger. In this talk, Brian Doucet bridges academic and non-academic responses to this extreme example of a fractured and divided, post-industrial city. He critically assesses the two dominant narratives which have characterised Detroit: that of the city as a metonym for urban failure, and a new narrative of the comeback city. Through including the perspectives of visionary Detroiters who do not normally feature in academic, policy or political debates, Doucet’s work documents many visions of hope which offer genuine alternatives for an inclusive and just city. This talk will discuss the main findings of the edited book Why Detroit Matters, as well as Detroit’s relevance for cities around the world.

Chair: Prof Hyun Bang Shin (LSE)

Introduction: Prof Loretta Lees (Leicester)

Speaker: Dr Brian Doucet (University of Waterloo, Canada)

Discussant(s): Prof Phil Hubbard (KCL)

Urban Salon (@theurbansalon) is a London based seminar series aimed at scholars, artists, practitioners and others who are exploring urban experiences within an international and comparative frame.

#Detroit #urbansalon #urbanstudies #urbanplanning #london

My paper in the new volume titled Social Justice and the City (ed. Nik Heynen)

Happy to see the publication of this volume, which includes a paper of mine entitled “Urban movements and the genealogy of urban rights discourses: the case of urban protesters against redevelopment and displacement in Seoul, South Korea” previously published in the Annals of the American Association of Geographers (http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/84866/). The new edited volume is the republication of all the papers that previously formed the journal’s special issue on the same title. #urban #socialjustice #rights #redevelopment #displacement #korea #seoul

Heynen, N. (ed.) (2019) Social Justice and the City. Routledge

https://www.routledge.com/Social-Justice-and-the-City-1st-Edition/Heynen/p/book/9781138322745

CFP: RC21 Stream (S6) on The Urban Spectre of ‘Global China’ and Critical Reflections on its Spatiality

Happy to announce this call for papers for a stream that I am organizing with two of my excellent former PhD students. We have been developing this particular research, and would like to interact with colleagues who share similar interests and critical perspectives. Deadline: 20th January 2019.


RC21 CFP: S6 – The Urban Spectre of ‘Global China’ and Critical Reflections on its Spatiality

RC21, 18-21 September 2019, Delhi, India (https://rc21delhi2019.com)

Convenors

Professor Hyun Bang Shin, London School of Economics and Political Science (UK)
Dr Yimin Zhao, Renmin University of China (China)
Dr Sin Yee Koh, Monash University Malaysia (Malaysia)

Stream synopsis

The overseas expansion of China’s economic influence has recently been foregrounded in media reports and policy debates. The term ‘Global China’ has been widely adopted to depict the geopolitical dimension of this immense flow of capital. However, there is still a lack of attention to the urban dimension of ‘Global China’, especially regarding its impacts on the (re)imaginings and manifestations of urban futures – both within and beyond China.

In extant literature on Global China, two main features stand out. The first is the tendency to bound discussions of China’s role in global capital flows within Africa, and to theorise this role in terms of neo-colonialism. The second feature is the overt focus on the role of Chinese capital in industrial sectors – for example through investigations of labour conflicts (Giese 2013), labour regimes (Lee 2009, 2018), and workplace regimes (Fei et al. 2018). While there are increasing discussions on the spatiality of ‘Global China’, especially in relation to the ’Belt and Road’ (BRI) discourse, they are still closely linked to industrial sectors. 

In this stream, we seek to address the existing gaps identified above through a focus on the urban spectre of ‘Global China’. We welcome theoretical, methodological, and empirical contributions that address the interconnections and intersections between the rise of ‘Global China’ and ‘the urban’ (broadly defined). We aim to bring together papers that (1) critically examine the differentiated modes of speculative and spectacular urban production; (2) discuss the ways in which ‘the urban’ has been reconfigured by ‘Global China’; and (3) identify the theoretical and empirical implications for urban futures.

Submit your abstract

Please send your abstract of not more than 300 words to Hyun (h.b.shin@lse.ac.uk), Yimin (zhao.y@ruc.edu.cn) and Sin Yee (koh.sinyee@monash.edu) and CC’d to rc21delhi@gmail.com before January 20th, 2019. Please indicate the stream number (S6), the session title, and your last name in the subject line. For more details, please see the official instruction at: https://rc21delhi2019.com/index.php/call-for-abstracts/ 

Questions 

If you have any questions regarding this stream, please email Hyun (h.b.shin@lse.ac.uk), Yimin (zhao.y@ruc.edu.cn) and Sin Yee (koh.sinyee@monash.edu). 

Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre

I have been busying myself during the autumn term with an LSE centre called Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre, which I hav begun directing since the beginning of August 2018. This newsletter in the tweet below sums up some of the activities of the Centre. 

NEWS

Prof Hyun Bang Shin appointed as LSE SEAC Director

Professor Hyun Bang Shin has commenced his directorship for SEAC on 01 August 2018. He is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies in the Department of Geography and Environment and has been working on the critical analysis of the political economy of urbanisation with particular attention to cities in Asian countries such as Vietnam, Singapore, South Korea, China and more recently, Ecuador. Prof Shin’s biography is available here.

SEAC staff presented at the 9th East Asian Regional Conference on Alternative Geography

Professor Hyun Bang Shin (Centre Director) and Dr Do Young Oh (Centre Coordinator) have participated in the 9th East Asian Regional Conference on Alternative Geography (EARCAG) between 10 and 12 December to give papers on Vietnam and Singapore respectively. Professor Shin additionally organised a session on ‘Urban Spectacles and Social Injustice in the Global East’.

LSE SEAC Director met the Centre donors

SEAC Director Professor Hyun Bang Shin visited Singapore to meet Centre donors, Professor Saw Swee Hock at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute and Mr Arvind Khattar, and to participate in the alumni event hosted by the Singapore LSE Trust and the Alumni Association of Singapore on 13 November 2018.