Shanghai Bund and Pudong in 2010: Shanghai’s Past and Future

The rise of Shanghai has been subject to academic scrutiny during last few decades. The study of Shanghai and other major coastal cities provides an window to understand China’s past, present and future, but sometimes, misdirects observers to believe that Shanghai (and a few other major coastal cities such as Guangzhou) represents China’s urbanism. As one of leading cities, what Shanghai does sets an example for other inland cities that admire Shanghai’s re-emergence as a world city. In this regard, understanding Shanghai’s urbanism is an interesting and necessary endeavour. On the other hand, it is necessary to understand China’s inland cities experience a differing degree of exposure and possession of economic, political and geographical assets (both existing and expected) that would influence the particular trajectory of their growth. Shanghai’s rise may not be something that can be easily replicated by other inland cities.

Shanghai Liujiazui (top) and Bund (bottom) (c) Hyun Shin 2010

Shanghai Liujiazui (top) and Bund (bottom) (c) Hyun Shin 2010

The view of Shanghai Pudong (top picture, left) from the Bund would probably represent the present and future of Shanghai. The dense cluster of modern high-rise office buildings with some additional commercial luxury condominiums may represent the kind of wealth and power that Shanghai as well as China as a whole would like to achieve on the globe. On the other hand, the view of the Bund from Pudong’s riverside promenade represents Shanghai’s past and present. The Bund is already a densely built area, but as seen in this picture (bottom picture, left), the hinterland of the Bund experiences denser, commercial development. The historic buildings along the Bund that date back to the early 20th century would probably remain conserved, possible to be dwarfed by taller buildings behind them. Continue reading